Gastric bypass

Home Obesity Bypass

Overview

Gastric bypass, also called Roux-en-Y (roo-en-wy) gastric bypass, is a type of weight-loss surgery that involves creating a small pouch from the stomach and connecting the newly created pouch directly to the small intestine. After gastric bypass, swallowed food will go into this small pouch of stomach and then directly into the small intestine, thereby bypassing most of your stomach and the first section of your small intestine.

Gastric bypass is done to help you lose excess weight and reduce your risk of potentially life-threatening weight-related health problems, including:

Gastroesophageal reflux disease
Heart disease
High blood pressure
High cholesterol
Obstructive sleep apnea
Type 2 diabetes
Stroke
Infertility

Gastric bypass is typically done only after you’ve tried to lose weight by improving your diet and exercise habits.

 

HOW YOU PREPARE

If you qualify for gastric bypass, your health care team gives you instructions on how to prepare for surgery. You may need to have various lab tests and exams before surgery.

 

FOOD AND MEDICATIONS

Before your surgery, give your doctor and any other health care providers a list of all medicines, vitamins, minerals, and herbal or dietary supplements you take. You may have restrictions on eating and drinking and which medications you can take.

If you take blood-thinning medications, talk with your doctor before your surgery. Because these medications affect clotting and bleeding, your blood-thinning medication routine may need to be changed.

If you have diabetes, talk with the doctor who manages your insulin or other diabetes medications for specific instructions on taking or adjusting them after surgery.

 

DURING THE PROCEDURE

The specifics of your gastric bypass depend on your individual situation and the doctor’s practices. Some surgeries are done with traditional large (open) incisions in your abdomen. However, most are performed laparoscopically, which involves inserting instruments through multiple small incisions in the abdomen.

After making the incisions with the open or laparoscopic technique, the surgeon cuts across the top of your stomach, sealing it off from the rest of your stomach. The resulting pouch is about the size of a walnut and can hold only about an ounce of food. Normally, your stomach can hold about 3 pints of food.

Then, the surgeon cuts the small intestine and sews part of it directly onto the pouch. Food then goes into this small pouch of stomach and then directly into the small intestine sewn to it. Food bypasses most of your stomach and the first section of your small intestine, and instead enters directly into the middle part of your small intestine.

Surgery usually takes a few hours. After surgery, you awaken in a recovery room, where medical staff monitors you for any complications.

RESULTS

Gastric bypass can provide long-term weight loss. The amount of weight you lose depends on your type of surgery and your change in lifestyle habits. It may be possible to lose 60 percent, or even more, of your excess weight within two years.

BEST CANDIDATES

Patients must have been obese for more than three years and have attempted to lose weight through diet, exercise and medications without success. Because weight gain is often a result of psychological factors, patients must have a psychiatrist’s clearance before they can have the surgery.

  • All transfers – Airport, Hotel, Clinic.
  • 4 nights at a 5* Hotel on a full board basis
  • Pre-operative tests
  • The anaesthetics
  • The surgeons
  • Compression garment
  • Personal assistant
  • Medication 
  • New sim card 
  • The stay at the clinic
  • Care by a nurse at the hotel throughout your stay

Extra personal expenses
Travel insurance
Flight ticket

Bypass – general anesthesia

Duration –  2.5 hours

Hospital stay –  2 /3 nights

Hotel stay – 4 nights

Back to work – 10 to 14 days

 3500£